Art Projects




About Short and Sweet Art Projects

Maybe it's a rainy day and your kids are wondering what to do...

Maybe your senior group has finally raffled off the quilt you worked on for six months and needs to produce some great stuff for the next bazaar...

Maybe you want to indulge in a little creativity, but don't feel like committing to a class or a lot of lessons...

Maybe you've never done anything creative before and want to try a little something to get your creative juices flowing. A Short and Sweet Art Project is the answer!



This is the place for you!

Here is a listing of my FREE SHORT AND SWEET ART PROJECTS that take from one, two or three hours to do. I've created these easy, information-rich video demonstrations that are, on the average, five minutes in length. You'll have fun following the simple instructions, watching the skill demonstration and creating a wonderful Short and Sweet Art Project!

Try one project, try many! Many students return again and again. And, of course, these Short and Sweet Art Projects are always free! Do some and do some more! Enjoy!




SHORT AND SWEET ART PROJECTS

Create A Greeting Card

Make A Clothes Horse

Make A Pinch Pot And Paint It

Make A Paper Quilt

Make A Patchwork Horse

Draw A Flower With Conte Crayon

Draw A Flower With Colored Pencils

Draw A Flower With Oil Pastels

Draw A Flower With Pencil

Draw A Horse With Pencil

Learning The Blot Painting Technique

Paint A Tree With Water Color

Paint Water Color People

Paint A Landscape With Water Color

Draw and Paint A Horse Using Water Color and Pencil


Click here for your FREE Short and Sweet Art Projects Page!




Real Feedback



I recently vistied your website and saw all of the great work you are doing! This is wonderful.

I would love to learn how to draw and was looking at a link to your basic drawing classes. I am hoping that you could send me the coarse information.

Also, I have a daughter who is very interested in art. She is being homeschooled. She has self-taught herself in painting but I am also looking for any coarse work that I could introduce to her studies as well.

Ericka J.

-----

I just watched your wonderful oil pastel on a photo and your shading video. Thanks so much! I have been struggling with how to work with oil pastels- I have taken some recreational art classes- but the blending on the paper is hard for me to fathom. If you still offer your oil pastel class I would be very interested.

Shelley

-----

Hello again Lois, Sorry I forgot to add that I can draw a bit & that all my art is done by mouth so I’ll need basic, easy instruction that are quick to work with. I hope this doesn’t make things to difficult & I understand if you are unable to help me. Thanks Again Katt

Dear Lois, Thank you for this. I will approach these tasks over the weekend & let you know how I go. Again I thank you for giving me the time to try & achieve my art.

katt

-----

I work for a Recreation & Parks Department and I was online searching for some art projects to use for our summer day camp program (and secretly for myself to satisfy the little artist in me!) I look forward to taking some of your online lessons.

Deb

-----

Hello, I have been drawing portraits lately and feel your crosshatching method has been very helpful! My shading has improved immensely!I will work on the line drawing as soon as I have time! Rose





Notes on Making Videos......

I look back at the first videos I made several years ago and I admit I'm amused at my lengthy dialogues I attached to various demonstrations of painting, drawing and printmaking.

At the onset, I pretty much applied my teaching style to my videos, figuring that a similar method of delivery which worked well with my students would be good for YouTube.

Over the years, however, I have refined my art lesson videos, making them shorter and more concentrated in instruction. I have also migrated away from the lengthy dialogues and let my annotations on the videos explain what I am doing. In this way, I think, hearing impaired viewers will garner just as much from my videos as those that can hear just fine.

Using annotations drew criticisms from some viewers who really wanted a dialogue and description of what I was doing. So, then I quit doing just annotations and went back to talking.

I feel I am still in the process of refinement with my videos. I am often envious of videos with a lot of great music and visuals that I, with my little Flip camcorder, can't produce. Then I think that educational videos need not have a lot of bells and whistles. What they do have to have, and what I strive for is good, simple, solid, information-rich instruction.

Into my sixth years doing YouTube videos, one rather disconcerting factor appears when I review my past videos. I am getting older, AND older. I can actually see myself aging in my videos. What a legacy!

Lois DeWitt